Global Black History
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NGO Social Engineering: The New Colonialism in Africa

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Ever since Africans challenged colonial powers and demanded that they govern themselves in their own affairs the West has been baffled about how to conquer Africa again. That was until they decided on a new plan called ‘NGO Social Engineering’. Instead of using armies to conquer Africa, they are going to use NGOs (Non governmental organizations) to promote their agendas. They realized that they had lost the battle but they were bent on winning the war. Communism was spreading across the continent like wildfire and it seemed that for a while the African were on an upward trajectory then along came the west with what they call ‘winning the hearts and minds’ and they have since captivated the hearts of young Africans who want to talk, like westerners, dress western and embody western ideals.

In Zimbabwe the High Court recently ruled that parents cannot use corporal punishment to discipline disobedient children. The lawsuit was brought forward by a single mother and a western funded NGO (Justice for Children Trust) to disrupt the conservative African family values.  NGOs are agents of social engineering in Africa in order to destabilize the traditional African values.  The purpose of these NGOs is to turn Africa into a wasteland just like they did with the black community in America.

In the 1960s in America, they eliminated corporal punishment in schools and at home and the results are self-evident. According to a report in the National Journal, a US publication, 2 million students are arrested every year in American public schools. This is the failed American model which has turned American schools into a war zone. It is no secret that the public school is the recruiting ground for America’s vast prison industrial complex. Children go to school and get killed in fights every day. Teachers who are forbidden from disciplining students then use the police as the authority. As a result many black children graduate from high school with police records which could have been avoided by allowing students to be punished in their local school.

Zimbabwe is not America and the passing of the law that forbids corporal punishment is another example of how western negativity has taken over solid African family values. The community should be empowered to discipline children and schools should be run by teachers and not students.  If Teachers and school administrators cannot use corporal punishment then when children fight they will have to call the police and the children will be sent to jail and become convicted criminals before they even become adults.

In addition to the NGO, our African ideals are being molded by western television. The glamour on the propaganda silver screen helps to idolize American culture which is evident in the introduction of shows like Big brother Africa. Young Africans were lured into sexual deviancy on the prospect of fame and $300,000 USD prize money. This depravity included sexual encounters in the shower something that can only be described as pornography on television. This rise of celebrity culture is being celebrated through various media outlets including blogs, celebrity websites and television shows. Many independent media outlets out of Africa are focusing on gossip and sexual deviance.

NGOs are helping to promote sexual deviance through the banner of feminism. In Africa, we have mistakenly adopted western style feminism without considering the ramifications. In the United States for example, the results of western style feminism are more households headed by single mothers, unruly children who cannot become productive citizens. This is what has happened in South Africa where people have mistaken political freedom to mean sexual freedom; the result has been devastating high levels of HIV which is robbing young lives of their potential to transform Africa.

Before we just accept the ‘free’ money from NGOs, let’s start asking questions about their values, their track records and their underlying belief system. The ‘free’ money from NGOs might just be the thing that robs our children’s futures.